Healing just feels better out here.

Breast Cancer Surgery – Dr. Ed Sauter

Surgery is more often than not a front-line attack against a diagnosis of breast cancer. But what type of surgery performed by what type of surgeon? These are the questions addressed by the U.T. Health Science Center at Tyler’s Dr. Ed Sauter in this post to HealthConnection.TV.

Why is surgery the first line of attack against breast cancer? (first question)

What are the surgical options for treating breast cancer? (skip to 0:31)

What is the difference between ‘mastectomy’ and ‘radical mastectomy?’ (skip to 1:07)

If breast cancer surgery becomes necessary, what are the advantages to having a surgeon who specializes in cancer? (skip to 1:55)

What factors influence a woman’s decision regarding her options for breast cancer surgery? (skip to 2:49)

Do surgery and radiation automatically go together in treating breast cancer? (skip to 3:31)

A growing number of women, especially younger women, are choosing to have both breasts removed as a preventive measure, even if only one breast is affected by cancer. What is driving this trend and is it a good idea? (skip to 3:58)

Some women who have a strong family history of breast cancer but no symptoms and no diagnosis of breast cancer themselves elect to have both breasts removed as a precaution against the disease. What are your thoughts on this? (skip to 5:11)

Is it better to wait until after breast cancer surgery before considering or beginning reconstruction? (skip to 6:22)

Do breast reconstruction or augmentation negatively impact the chance of detecting a new or recurring breast cancer? (skip to 7:18)

Is there anything a woman can do to reduce the likelihood of getting breast cancer? (skip to 8:39)

Are there lifestyle choices that are important with respect to avoiding breast cancer? (skip to 10:35)

Pulmonary Hypertension – Dr. Julie Philley

When your heart has to work extra hard to pump blood into your lungs, the condition is called pulmonary hypertension. When not treated, it can lead to shortness of breath, dizziness and ultimately heart failure. University of Texas Health Science Center pulmonologist Dr. Julie Philley answers questions about pulmonary hypertension in this post to HealthConnection.TV.

What is pulmonary hypertension and what causes it? (first question)

How is pulmonary hypertension different from common high blood pressure? (skip to 0:50)

What are the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension? (skip to 1:31)

Are there groups of people who are at higher risk for pulmonary hypertension? (skip to 1:53)

How do you know if you have pulmonary hypertension? How is it diagnosed? (skip to 2:13)

How serious is pulmonary hypertension and can it be cured? (skip to 3:07)