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Category: Heart Disease

Atrial Fibrillation – Dr. Sam Daya

Do you ever feel a pounding, fluttering, or racing sensation in your chest? What about light-headedness, confusion, or shortness of breath all at the same time? If you experience these symptoms, you may have atrial fibrillation, or ‘AFib.’ Left untreated, AFib can lead to life-threatening blood clots or a weakened heart that results in heart failure. Atrial fibrillation is a serious health matter. Persons that suffer atrial fibrillation are five to seven times more likely than the general population to have a stroke. In this post to HealthConnection.TV, U.T. Health Science Center at Tyler cardiologist Dr. Sam Daya answers questions on diagnosing and treating atrial fibrillation.

What is atrial fibrillation or AFib? (first question)

What causes atrial fibrillation? (skip to 0:32)

How do you know if you have atrial fibrillation? Are there specific symptoms? (skip to 0:51)

How is atrial fibrillation diagnosed? (skip to 1:47)

How is atrial fibrillation treated? (skip to 2:55)

Is atrial fibrillation dangerous? (skip to 3:57)

What is the connection between atrial fibrillation and an increased risk for stroke? (skip to 4:28)

Can atrial fibrillation be prevented? (skip to 5:46)

What does the future hold for treating patients with atrial fibrillation? (skip to 6:24)

 

 

Childhood Obesity – Dr. Jonathan MacClements

As many as 40 percent of fourth grade children are now clinically defined as either overweight or obese. This is leading to an explosion of problems such as heart disease, high blood pressure, Type II diabetes and other conditions that were once thought to be mainly adult health concerns. Dr. Jonathan MacClements discusses childhood obesity, including its treatment and prevention.

How much of a problem is childhood obesity? (first question)

Why is childhood obesity considered a health problem? (skip to 0:39)

How do I know if my child is considered obese? (skip to 1:00)

Can a child actually develop heart disease, Type II diabetes, high blood pressure or sleep apnea as a result of being overweight? (skip to 1:45)

Can being overweight affect a child when he or she reaches puberty? (skip to 2:10)

What is the single most important thing to be done to reduce the likelihood of my child becoming obese? (skip to 2:32)

How can I involve my child in overcoming a weight problem without undermining self-confidence? (skip to 3:18)

Metabolic Syndrome – Dr. Patti Olusola

Take any three of elevated blood pressure, excess abdominal fat, high triglycerides, high blood sugar or low “good” cholesterol and what you have is a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. With that diagnosis, you are at greater risk for heart attack, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and stroke. The U.T. Health Science Center’s Dr. Patti Olusola talks about diagnosing, treating and preventing metabolic syndrome.

What is metabolic syndrome? (first question)

What are the risk factors for metabolic syndrome? (skip to 1:20)

Why is having metabolic syndrome so alarming? (skip to 1:58)

Are there signs or symptoms to look for? (skip to 2:20)

How is metabolic syndrome diagnosed? (skip to 3:11)

How is metabolic syndrome treated? (skip to 4:17)

Are children at risk for developing metabolic syndrome? (skip to 5:19)

Why is metabolic syndrome becoming more common? (skip to 5:47)

If you lose weight, what effect will it have on the risk factors for metabolic syndrome? (skip to 6:26)

Can metabolic syndrome be reversed? (skip to 7:23)

Work as Hard for Your Heart as it Works for You – Dr. Dudley Goulden

Did you know your heart is a muscle just like the biceps in your arm or the quadriceps in your legs? It’s considered to be the hardest working muscle in your body; beating more than 3.5 billion times during an average lifespan. And like any hard-working muscle, your heart needs a healthy diet, regular exercise, and a good night’s sleep to stay healthy. But what actually happens to this vital muscle over time when you have diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol? U.T. Health Science Center at Tyler cardiologist Dr. Dudley Goulden answers questions about maintaining a healthy heart muscle in this post to HealthConnection.TV.

Why do we call the heart a muscle? (first question)

What happens to the heart muscle during a heart attack? (skip to 1:03)

How does congestive heart failure affect the heart muscle? (skip to 1:51)

What does the term “weak heart” mean? (skip to 2:50)

What do high blood pressure and high cholesterol do to the heart? (skip to 3:25)

How does cigarette smoking and other nicotine exposure affect the heart muscle? (skip to 4:50)

How does aerobic exercise change the heart muscle? (skip to 5:46)

What do you recommend for the average person with respect to aerobic exercise? (skip to 6:35)

What changes will a healthy diet make to improve the heart muscle? (skip to 7:13)

Women: A Heart Attack Every 90 Seconds – Dr. Sridevi Pitta

It may come as a surprise to know that women are less likely than men to have the typical clutching-the-chest “Hollywood heart attack.” Instead, women may experience pressure or pain in the lower chest or upper abdomen. Many women who have had heart attacks also use words like “breathlessness,” “nausea,” “fatigue,” or “dizziness” to describe their symptoms. In this post to HealthConnection.TV, heart disease expert Dr. Sridevi Pitta offers educational advice about women and heart attacks.

Are the symptoms of a heart attack different for women? (first question)

For women who have had a heart attack, how do they describe it? (skip to 1:56)

Do heart attack symptoms for women come on suddenly or are there warning signs prior to the attack? (skip to 2:590

Is there one particular symptom of heart attack or a combination of symptoms that should convince a woman that she needs to go to the Emergency Room? (skip to 3:57)

Why, in the presence of potential symptoms of heart attack, are women so reluctant to call 9-1-1? (skip to 4:54)

Why do so many physicians overlook the symptoms of heart attack in women? (skip to 5:41)

If a woman knows the signs and believes she is having a heart attack, but gets to the Emergency Room and is told that it’s probably indigestion or lack of rest, what should she do? (skip to 7:04)

Do you recommend that women take a low dose of aspirin as an aid in preventing heart attack? (skip to 8:21)

What is your opinion regarding supplements such as fish oil or CoQ10 with respect to preventing or treating heart disease? (skip to 9:30)

What is your best advice to help women reduce the chance of having a heart attack? (skip to 11:47)

The Diabetes Links – Dr. David Shafer

Diabetes is a very serious disease in and of itself. But it doesn’t stop there. Ongoing clinical research is revealing that diabetes has causal or complicating links to a range of other serious health problems including the most common cancers, hearing loss, dementia, heart attack and stroke. In the latest post to HealthConnection.TV, the U.T. Health Science Center at Tyler’s Dr. David Shafer answers questions on the diabetes links.

What is diabetes and why does there appear to be links between it and other serious diseases? (first question)

Are the links to other diseases equally attributable to Type I and Type II diabetes? (skip to 1:32)

What is the link between diabetes and heart attack or stroke? (skip to 3:23)

Why do people with diabetes have a greater risk of hearing loss? (skip to 4:18)

What is the connection between diabetes and cancer? (skip to 5:29)

Why would someone with diabetes be more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease or dementia? (skip to 7:03)

What is the link between diabetes and hypertension (high blood pressure)? (skip to 9:30)

Are these risks increased irrespective of how well diabetes is managed by the patient? (skip to 10:40)

 

Angina: A Pain in the Chest – Dr. Dudley Goulden

Sufferers describe it as feeling as if they have an elephant sitting on their chests. Chest pain, difficulty breathing, an oppressive feeling. These are symptoms of classic angina, a transient lack of oxygen to the heart caused by blockage in the vessels supplying the heart muscle with blood. In almost all cases, angina is a very serious symptom of heart disease. In this post to HealthConnection.TV, U.T. Health Science Center at Tyler cardiologist Dr. Dudley Goulden answers the most important questions on angina.

What is angina and how does it differ from a heart attack? (first question)

What causes angina and is it serious? (skip to 0:50)

Who is at risk for developing angina? (skip to 1:16)

Does the presence of angina automatically mean you have heart disease? (skip to 1:55)

What are the symptoms of angina? (skip to 2:20)

What are the different types of angina and is it important to know which type you have? (skip to 2:51)

How is angina diagnosed? (skip to 3:20)

How is angina treated? (skip to 3:57)

Can angina be cured? (skip to 4:51)

If someone has angina, what are the best steps to take toward living with it? (skip to 5:48)

Omega-3 & Heart Health – Dr. Dudley Goulden

We’re generally told to cut down on the amount of fat in our diets but there are some fats that are actually essential. One such fat is Omega-3 fatty acids. In this post to HealthConnection.TV, U.T. Health Science Center Cardiologist Dr. Dudley Goulden talks about Omega-3 and how to get it in your diet for the benefit of your heart.

What are Omega-3 fatty acids? (first question)

Doesn’t fat cause heart disease? (skip to 0:39)

What is the connection between Omega-3 fatty acids and heart health? (skip to 1:08)

Are there other health benefits to Omega-3 fatty acids? (skip to 1:46)

What foods contain Omega-3 fatty acids? (skip to 2:16)

Do we get enough Omega-3 fatty acids in what we eat? (skip to 3:11)

Are fish oil supplements that contain Omega-3 effective in improving heart health? (skip to 3:44)

Should we take fish oil supplements? (skip to 4:25)

Are all fish oil supplements created equal? (skip to 5:16)

How much fish oil supplement should one take? (skip to 6:11)

How much is too much? Are there dangers to having too much Omega-3 in your system? (skip to 6:53)

If one carefully follows the recommendations regarding Omega-3 fatty acids, how effective will such a regimen be in reducing the risk for heart disease? (skip to 7:29)

Dr. Dudley Goulden – Heart Medications

Doctors today have an array of safe and effective medications for the treatment of heart disease. Each medication has a specific purpose and care must be taken when using them in combination. Dr. Dudley Goulden discusses heart medications in this post to healthconnection.tv from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler.

What are the differences between beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins in the treatment of heart disease? (first question)

How successful are these drugs in treating heart disease? (skip to 0:55)

Are there side effects to be concerned about in connection with these heart medications? (skip to 01:26)

Is there any one medication that has proved better than others in treating heart disease? (skip to 02:05)

If I have high blood pressure, is it a given that I should be taking a diuretic? (skip to 02:42)

Are heart disease medications like statins, aspirin and beta blockers underutilized in treating heart disease in women? (skip to 03:20)

With respect to adults over age 50, what percentage of them suffer with high blood pressure? (skip to 04:12)

What is your opinion concerning a daily aspirin regimen with respect to preventing or treating heart disease? (skip to 04:46)

Are there potential problems with the long-term use of heart disease medications that could outweigh the benefits? (skip to 05:36)

Are there any promising new heart disease medications on the horizon? (skip to 06:23)