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Category: Metabolic Syndrome

Insulin Resistance – Gerald Brown, P.A.

When the body doesn’t use the insulin it naturally produces in an efficient manner, it’s called insulin resistance and it’s the first step on the road to diabetes. Physician Assistant and Certified Diabetes Educator Gerald Brown discusses insulin resistance in this edition of Health Connection.

What is insulin and what role does it play in the body? (first question)

What is insulin resistance? (skip to 0:45)

What causes insulin resistance? (skip to 1:10)

Who is at risk for developing insulin resistance? (skip to 1:40)

What health problems can insulin resistance cause? (skip to 2:10)

Do all people with insulin resistance automatically have diabetes too? (skip to 2:37)

What are the symptoms of insulin resistance? (skip to 3:10)

How is insulin resistance diagnosed? (skip to 3:20)

How is insulin resistance treated? (skip to 3:51)

Are there lifestyle choices that can be made that will reduce the chances of developing insulin resistance? (skip to 4:13)

What foods should we eat more of and what foods should we avoid if we suffer with insulin resistance? (skip to 4:53)

Can children have insulin resistance? (skip to 5:16)

Can insulin resistance be reversed or cured? (skip to 5:40)

Metabolic Syndrome – Dr. Patti Olusola

Take any three of elevated blood pressure, excess abdominal fat, high triglycerides, high blood sugar or low “good” cholesterol and what you have is a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. With that diagnosis, you are at greater risk for heart attack, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and stroke. The U.T. Health Science Center’s Dr. Patti Olusola talks about diagnosing, treating and preventing metabolic syndrome.

What is metabolic syndrome? (first question)

What are the risk factors for metabolic syndrome? (skip to 1:20)

Why is having metabolic syndrome so alarming? (skip to 1:58)

Are there signs or symptoms to look for? (skip to 2:20)

How is metabolic syndrome diagnosed? (skip to 3:11)

How is metabolic syndrome treated? (skip to 4:17)

Are children at risk for developing metabolic syndrome? (skip to 5:19)

Why is metabolic syndrome becoming more common? (skip to 5:47)

If you lose weight, what effect will it have on the risk factors for metabolic syndrome? (skip to 6:26)

Can metabolic syndrome be reversed? (skip to 7:23)

Diabetes: The Story Behind the Stats – Dr. David Shafer

Of all the things that can rob you of a long, healthy life, none looms larger than diabetes. From blindness to the loss of limbs to the high cost of the nation’s health care bill, diabetes looms large. In this post to HeatlhConnection.TV, the U.T.Health Science Center at Tyler’s Dr. David Shafer talks about recognizing and acting on risk factors for diabetes.

Nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States, 8.3 percent of the population, have been diagnosed with diabetes. Has the number always been this high? (first question)

The American Diabetes Association estimates that in addition to the 8.3 percent of the population that is diagnosed with the disease, another seven percent is undiagnosed. How do you have diabetes and not know it? (skip to 1:21)

Another alarming statistic tells us that there are 79 million people who are pre-diabetic. What does pre-diabetic mean? (skip to 2:06)

How do you test for pre-diabetes? (skip to 3:00)

If you have pre-diabetes, is diabetes inevitable? (skip to 3:31)

Sixty percent of all non-traumatic lower limb amputations occur in people with diabetes. If you have diabetes, what is the likelihood that you will lose a toe or a foot or a leg to amputation? (skip to 4:41)

What is the connection between diabetes and the risk for lower extremity amputation? (skip to 5:43)

Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults age 20 to 74. Why? (skip to 6:38)

Nearly 13 percent of African-Americans and nearly 12 percent of Hispanics have diabetes but only 7.1 percent of the white population is diabetic. Why the difference? (skip to 7:50)

One in three children that were born in 2010 will develop diabetes during their lifetimes. How do we reverse this shocking trend? (skip to 9:24)

Recognizing the impact of obesity on the risk for diabetes and recognizing diabetes’ impact on the cost of health care, if we as a society went back to weighing what we did in the 1950s and 1960s, what impact would that have on the nation’s overall health care bill? (skip to 10:52)

 

Triglycerides – Gerald Brown, P.A.

If you eat too much, particularly if you eat a lot of starchy fatty foods, chances are your triglycerides will become elevated, putting you at risk for a host of health problems. On the other hand, triglycerides are an essential blood fat, made by your liver to provide instant energy when it’s needed. U.T. Health Science Center Physician Assistant Gerry Brown talks about triglycerides — the good and the bad — in this post to HealthConnection.TV.

What are triglycerides? (first question)

What is the difference between triglycerides and cholesterol? (skip to 0:32)

What purpose do triglycerides serve — are they important to good health? (skip to 1:00)

How do you measure triglycerides? (skip to 1:21)

What things can cause triglyceride levels to be too high? (skip to 1:43)

Can you have high triglycerides without having high cholesterol or do they always go hand-in-hand? (skip to 2:26)

There’s a debate in the medical community regarding high triglycerides — are they a risk factor in and of themselves or only when combined with other disease markers such as high cholesterol? (skip to 2:45)

What is the medical treatment for high triglycerides? (skip to 3:28)

Are supplements such as Omega-3 fish oil effective in treating high triglycerides? (skip to 4:04)

Are there lifestyle changes that can be made to reduce high triglycerides? (skip to 4:40)